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Insalata Tricolore

Insalata Tricolore


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I'd like to share one of my favorite antipasti with you. It is a rocket and tomato salad with slivers of Parmigiano-Reggiano and bresaola. I like to eat it with a light lemon and extra-virgin olive oil vinaigrette.

Click here to see 11 Classic Antipasto Recipes for Summer.

Ingredients

  • 2 Tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1/4 Cup plus 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 7 Ounces bresaola, sliced thinly
  • 2 Cups baby arugula
  • 5 cherry tomatoes, halved
  • Pinch of salt
  • 3 slivers Parmigiano-Reggiano

Secret Recipe: Pizzeria Delfina's Insalata Tricolore

The key to Pizzeria Delfina's refreshing Insalata Tricolore is the lemon vinaigrette. The dressing is so good that the restaurant even bottles and sells the citrusy elixir to their customers. Lucky for us, the pizzeria has decided to share the wealth with an easy-to-make-at-home recipe. Enjoy!

Insalata Tricolore

For Lemon Vinaigrette

1 small shallot, finely minced

Kosher salt to taste (add salt in small amounts, tasting as you go)

1. Soak shallots and zest in lemon juice and vinegar for 5 minutes.

2. Add in salt and pepper.

3. Slowly stream in oil, whisking vigorously. Adjust seasoning

2 heads endive, cut crosswise into ½” slices

1 head radicchio, cut lengthwise into 1/2” Julliene

1. Season each lettuce and toss in lemon vinaigrette separately.

2. To plate, arrange the dressed radicchio, endive, and arugula on a bias.

3. Using a peeler, shave thin strips of grana padano over the top of the salad.


Recipe: Insalata tricolore

Note: Adapted from Mozza executive chef Matt Molina. This will make more dressing than is required for the salads.

2 tablespoons lemon juice

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1/2 cup best-quality olive oil

4 cups wild or baby arugula (about 1/4 pound)

4 cups frisée, center stems removed (about 1/4 pound)

4 cups radicchio, julienned (roughly one large head)

5 tablespoons grated Parmigiano-Reggiano, divided

1. To make the dressing, place the anchovies, vinegar, lemon juice, garlic, kosher salt and pepper in a small bowl and whisk to incorporate. Slowly add the olive oil into the dressing while whisking to emulsify. This makes about three-fourths cup dressing. Set aside.

2. In a large bowl, add the arugula, frisée and radicchio, a dash of salt, 3 tablespoons of the Parmigiano-Reggiano and just shy of one-half cup of the dressing and toss well. Divide onto six salad plates and top each with the remaining Parmigiano-Reggiano (1 teaspoon for each salad). Serve immediately.

Each serving: 199 calories 2 grams protein 5 grams carbohydrates 2 grams fiber 19 grams fat 3 grams saturated fat 5 mg. cholesterol 236 mg. sodium.

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Insalata Tricolore

If you are lucky enough to have some decent tomatoes, a big, blousy buffalo mozzarella and avocado that is fully ripe but not squishy, that is the time to make this classic dish. I’m making it a lot at the moment for lockdown lunches, interspersed, while the season lasts, with British asparagus and soft-poached eggs. There are countless ways of presenting insalata tricolore on a large platter for sharing, the overlapping slices chunky or slim but here roughly hewn to fit neatly into one of my beloved Apilco oval porcelain gratin dishes. With crusty bread and butter, it’s hard to beat. Quantities are approximate, vary up or down and use mint, as I did, instead of basil

1 buffalo mozzarella cheese

Cut the core out of the tomatoes in a pointed plug shape. Slice thickly. Thickly slice the mozzarella. Run a sharp knife round the length of the avocado, cutting to the stone. Twist apart the halves, winkle out the stone with the knife and remove the skin and slice thickly. Squeeze over the lemon juice. Arrange everything in a muddle of your choice on a plate/plates/platter or dish like mine, squeeze and splash with olive oil. Season with freshly grated black pepper and a crumble of Maldon sea salt (if poss). Decorate with basil leaves. Best if left for a few minutes for the juices to mingle and develop but not for too long because the avo will discolour.


Insalata Tricolore

It's such nice weather for a September morning, that it was a pleasure to do my new early morning 6k trot around Regent's Park.

In the last month or so, I have managed to keep up my 'three trots around Regent's Park per week' routine fairly well, and I am pleased to say that I have managed to shed a whopping 7.5 kilos. I am now half way to my target weight of 80kgs.

Of course, it's not all about exercise - I need to stay away from my hamburger obsession. I haven't totally managed it (McD's on the weekend - oops), but I am definitely doing better than usual. One way to keep eating well is to eat a lot of raw foods. Today's dish is a perfect example.

I have no idea how many calories are in a ball of mozzarella, or in a couple of tablespoons of olive oil, and I don't care. If this dish is all I'm eating for a meal, then BRING ON THE CHEESE! Obviously, my lackadaisical attitude towards dairy consumption can't be all bad, or I would not have lost a few inches of tread from my spare tyre so effortlessly. So there.

The key to a good insalata tricolore, is to use lots of fresh basil - like a salad garnish rather than a herb - lots of good quality dried oregano to season the cheese, and lots of top quality peppery extra virgin olive oil. I also use a splash of red wine vinegar to cut the richness of the cheese and avocado, but this is strictly a personal preference.

Oh, and one last thing: I only use cheap mozzarella (not the hard or grated stuff, but the 'value' one in the plastic bag full of water). For some reason, a good quality buffala seems a bit to gooey and jelly-like for this recipe. Buffala is great in cooking, but when eaten raw in a salad, the firmer cheaper stuff compliments the other ingredients a little better.

Because I'm using cheap mozzarella in this dish - 44p per 125g ball - this recipe comes in at a fab ٟ.50 per serving. Great as a starter or lunch, or as a dinner with garlic bread if you're not feeling as wobbly as me.

1 large avocado, peeled and cut into large chunks
2 balls of mozzarella cheese, cut into 1cm slices
4 tomatoes, cut into 5mm slices
Large handful of fresh basil leaves
2 teaspoons of dried oregano
3-4 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil
Splash of red wine vinegar (optional)
Salt and black pepper

Arrange the avocado, mozzarella and tomatoes in to three strips down the centre of the plate to make the stripes of the Italian flag. Garnish with the basil leaves and sprinkle the oregano over the cheese and tomato. Sprinkle with the oil and vinegar, if using. Season liberally - the ingredients are deliciously bland and need heavy seasoning.


Insalata Caprese

With its distinctive red, white and green tricolore ingredients Insalata Caprese literally flies the flag for all Italian salads. Purists would say that it should only be eaten in the summer as the tomatoes should ripened on the vine so that they are not too soft but juicy and full of flavour from the mineral rich volcanic soil found near the Vesuvius. The basil should be young, tender and also grown in the earth and the mozzarella preferably the best “mozzarella di bufala”, made from buffalo milk, from the Campania region around Naples. And don’t even think about dousing the salad in any olive oil. Only genuine extra-virgin will do. Of course there are many variations on the theme and many confuse the Caprese with the Insalata Tricolore, which is a salad made up with the colours of the Italian flag, mozzarella and tomato combined with any other green ingredient, commonly arugula. I, however, was hoping for the real deal when I visited the island of Capri, birthplace of Insalata Caprese.

The island is synonymous with glamour and has appealed to the wealthy and the famous for centuries right back when it was the private playground of the Roman Emperor Augustus in the 1st century A.D. and later home to Tiberius, his successor. In latter years, Capri attracted writers such as D.H.Lawrence, George Bernard Shaw and Graham Greene, and film stars such as Grace Kelly, Greta Garbo and Elizabeth Taylor. It still attracts a jet set crowd but also a steady trail of day-trippers. If you want to experience a little of the old Capri glamour it’s best to stay on the island as the island is truly at its best once the last ferry departs going back to the mainland at around 5pm.

I whiled away an afternoon wandering through the wisteria-covered alleyways of Capri town and up to the ruins of Tiberius’s Villa Jovis, a crumbling complex of imperial quarters, baths and servants rooms including the Salto di Tiberio, a balcony over the sea from which Tiberius is said to have hurled insolent servants. Maybe they hadn’t served him a perfect Insalata Caprese for his supper because according to legend it was Tiberius who first came up with the recipe sometime around the end of the I century A.D.. Some say it was Constantino Moffa, a native of Capri, who first took the recipe off the island when he worked as a Maitre d’ in a Swiss hotel. The chef liked the look of Constantino’s lunch so much he put it on the menu. There’s still a lively debate on where and when the dish actually originated but there’s no doubt that its popularity soared after it was served up to the jet-setting playboy King Farouk of Egypt in the 1950s. Suddenly it appeared on the menus of the most fashionable restaurants all over the world.


Capri

En route back to town I took a detour to the Arco Naturale, an immense rock that has been formed into an arch by the constant pounding of the sea. Capri is idyllically peaceful at dusk and I sat in the Giardini di Augusto (gardens of Augustus) and watched the sun disappear behind the Faraglioni rock stacks. I hadd worked up an appetite exploring the island so headed for Restaurant Villa Verde, where I had heard the Insalata Caprese was “to die for”. I didn’t even peruse the menu before placing my order with Franco, Villa Verde’s ebullient host. Even though the Caprese is called an “Insalata” it is normally served as an antipasto (starter) rather than a contorno (side dish) and I ordered mine as such. It came traditionally served in sumptuous layered circles of moist Mozzarella and deep red tomatoes, topped with delicate baby basil. I love the sweet pungent aroma of this delicious herb. I was left to dress it myself with the extra virgin olive oil, which I drizzled generously until the scarlet tomatoes glistened. It was simply delicious, especially washed down with a good vintage of Capri Bianco. I raised a glass to Tiberius. What ever people say about his temper he had excellent taste in food.


INGREDIENTS

To prepare insalata russa (Italian-style coleslaw) first put the eggs in a saucepan, cover with cold water and cook for 9 minutes from when the water starts boiling 1 . Once cooked, put them in a bowl with water to cool. Meanwhile, peel carrots and potatoes and cut them into 1/5-inch (1/2 cm) 2 3 cubes.

Take a large saucepan to steam the vegetables: first add the potatoes and cook for 10 minutes 4 , then add the peas and cook for another 7-10 minutes 5 . Finally add the carrots, cover with the lid and cook for another 5-7 minutes 6 .

Now shell the eggs 7 and dice them too 8 . When the vegetables are cooked 9 , transfer them to a bowl and let them cool down.

Add the hard boiled eggs to your warm vegetables 10 , then season with salt, pepper, oil 11 and apple cider vinegar 12 . Stir gently and let it cool.

Meanwhile prepare the mayonnaise: put the yolks in a bowl, add salt 13 , pepper and white wine vinegar 14 , then start working with an electric mixer 15 .

Pour the vegetable oil in a thin stream, taking care to do it very slowly to prevent mayonnaise from breaking 16 . When the mixture is whipped, add lemon juice 16 and whisk it again until the desired consistency is obtained 18 .

Pour the mayonnaise into the vegetables and mix everything together 19 . Let the insalata russa (Italian-style coleslaw) rest in the fridge for at least one hour 20 before serving and enjoying it 21 !


Wilted Insalata Tricolore

I’m salad hungry. But I’m also cold to the bone and craving something warm. I sautéed raddichio in a Greek pasta recipe last month and am thinking I’ll take this one step further tonight and turn one of my favorite tossed salads, Insalata Tricolore, into a warm salad, wilting it in garlic-infused olive oil.

The classic Italian Insalata Tricolore, composed of raddichio, endive and arugula, is to my palate, one of the most delicious and beautiful of simple salad combinations. The sweet, earthly balsamic vinegar tames the natural bitterness of the radicchio and endive.

The peppery and delicious flavor of locally grown arugula bears little resemblance in flavor to the arugula available for purchase in the ubiquitous plastic tubs.

This plastic tub variety only whispers the robust flavor of freshly grown arugula. At this time of the year, though, the plastic tub variety will suffice.

Of course you don’t have to sauté the greens simply follow the recipe skipping that step making a vinaigrette with the olive oil, vinegar and garlic. I served this with a rotisserie chicken, purchased from Whole Foods deli. I especially enjoy loading the chicken and greens onto a piece of crusty, freshly baked bread.


  • 8 cups baby arugula
  • 2 small heads radicchio, cored and leaves torn into bite sized pieces
  • 3 heads endive, cored and sliced into ½-inch pieces
  • 6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 small wedge young Provola, for shaving

Put the greens in a large serving bowl. Drizzle with the olive oil and vinegar and toss well to coat all of the leaves. Season with salt and pepper and toss again. Shave the cheese over top with a vegetable peeler, toss gently and serve.


Wilted Insalata Tricolore (Italian 3-Color Salad)

Peggy Lampman | Contributor

I'm salad hungry. But I'm also cold to the bone and craving something warm. I sautéed radicchio in a Greek pasta recipe last month and am thinking I'll take this one step further tonight and turn one of my favorite tossed salads, Insalata Tricolore, into a warm salad, wilting it in garlic-infused olive oil.

The classic Italian Insalata Tricolore, composed of radicchio, endive and arugula, is to my palate, one of the most delicious and beautiful of simple salad combinations. The sweet, earthly balsamic vinegar tames the natural bitterness of the radicchio and endive.

Classic Tricolore Combination: Raddichio, arugula and endive.

This plastic tub variety only whispers the robust flavor of freshly grown arugula. At this time of the year, though, the plastic tub variety will suffice.

Of course you don't have to sauté the greens simply follow the recipe skipping that step making a vinaigrette with the olive oil, vinegar and garlic. I served this with a rotisserie chicken, purchased from Whole Foods deli. I especially enjoy loading the chicken and greens onto a piece of crusty, freshly baked bread.

Yield: 4 servings Time: 10 minutes Cost: $8.00

1 head raddichio, washed and sliced or torn into large pieces 8 cups loosely packed arugula,washed and trimmed of tough stems 2 heads belgian endive, washed, trimmed and sliced lengthwise into 3/4-inch slices 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1 teaspoon minced garlic 1-2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar Grated Parmigianno Reggiano

1. Wash the radicchio and arugula, tear into pieces and gently dry in a salad spinner. Rinse the endive and pat dry with a paper towl. 2. In a large sauté pan, heat olive oil over medium heat and sauté garlic until fragrant, about 1 minute. 3. Add raddichio and endive to oil and sauté, with a pinch of kosher salt, 2 minutes, stirring. Add arugula to pan and sauté until just wilted. Toss with 1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar, adding more to taste, if desired. Top with freshly ground pepper, Parmesan and serve.

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Watch the video: Festa della Repubblica con l Insalata tricolore..colori e sapori italiani con sorpresa finale