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Tokyo Restaurant Kicks out Couples So Singles Won’t Feel Lonely

Tokyo Restaurant Kicks out Couples So Singles Won’t Feel Lonely


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“Table for one” doesn’t sound so bad now, does it?

A restaurant in Tokyo is looking to make the holiday blues a little bit more tolerable. The message also says that the presence of couples “would cause severe emotional trauma to members of our staff,” with a photo of two stick figures and a heart with a giant red “X” through the drawing. We’re no experts, but it sounds like these folks are bitter.

"To start with, someone said we should ban couples as a bit of a joke, but then we realized that it's true," employee Takashi Kyozuka told The Telegraph. "If you are single on Christmas Eve, then it's easy to get down."

Interestingly enough, Christmas is not very widely celebrated in Japan, as less than one percent of the population is Christian, but Christmas Eve has become a night symbolic of gift-exchanging for young couples in Japan, similar to Valentine’s Day.

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Why fewer Japanese are seeking marriage

The number of young Japanese men and women wanting to get married has seen a sharp decline, reveals a new study. What are the reasons behind this trend and how is it impacting society? Julian Ryall reports from Tokyo.

Looking back, Makoto Watanabe wishes he had gotten married in his early 30s, but he admits back then he had neither the job security nor the financial resources to support a wife and family.

Now he is 41-years old and a lecturer in communications and media at Hokkaido Bunkyo University. But Watanabe says he fears he may have left it too late.

"The older I get, the busier I also seem to get and there are fewer and fewer opportunities to meet 'the one'," he told DW. "Now I have my career and I'm comfortably off, but I certainly have regrets that I did not marry when I had a chance when I was younger."

Watanabe's plight is identical to that of thousands of young Japanese men and women, who are unable to find a partner due to any one of a number of reasons, although the largest obstacles remain an inadequate salary to support a family and punishing work schedules limiting opportunities to interact with the opposite sex.

Demographic time bomb

And with Japan already struggling to find ways to overcome a demographic challenge of too few babies being born and people living longer - thus requiring more pensions and expensive advanced medical care - the results of a new survey make bleak reading.

Share


Why fewer Japanese are seeking marriage

The number of young Japanese men and women wanting to get married has seen a sharp decline, reveals a new study. What are the reasons behind this trend and how is it impacting society? Julian Ryall reports from Tokyo.

Looking back, Makoto Watanabe wishes he had gotten married in his early 30s, but he admits back then he had neither the job security nor the financial resources to support a wife and family.

Now he is 41-years old and a lecturer in communications and media at Hokkaido Bunkyo University. But Watanabe says he fears he may have left it too late.

"The older I get, the busier I also seem to get and there are fewer and fewer opportunities to meet 'the one'," he told DW. "Now I have my career and I'm comfortably off, but I certainly have regrets that I did not marry when I had a chance when I was younger."

Watanabe's plight is identical to that of thousands of young Japanese men and women, who are unable to find a partner due to any one of a number of reasons, although the largest obstacles remain an inadequate salary to support a family and punishing work schedules limiting opportunities to interact with the opposite sex.

Demographic time bomb

And with Japan already struggling to find ways to overcome a demographic challenge of too few babies being born and people living longer - thus requiring more pensions and expensive advanced medical care - the results of a new survey make bleak reading.

Share


Why fewer Japanese are seeking marriage

The number of young Japanese men and women wanting to get married has seen a sharp decline, reveals a new study. What are the reasons behind this trend and how is it impacting society? Julian Ryall reports from Tokyo.

Looking back, Makoto Watanabe wishes he had gotten married in his early 30s, but he admits back then he had neither the job security nor the financial resources to support a wife and family.

Now he is 41-years old and a lecturer in communications and media at Hokkaido Bunkyo University. But Watanabe says he fears he may have left it too late.

"The older I get, the busier I also seem to get and there are fewer and fewer opportunities to meet 'the one'," he told DW. "Now I have my career and I'm comfortably off, but I certainly have regrets that I did not marry when I had a chance when I was younger."

Watanabe's plight is identical to that of thousands of young Japanese men and women, who are unable to find a partner due to any one of a number of reasons, although the largest obstacles remain an inadequate salary to support a family and punishing work schedules limiting opportunities to interact with the opposite sex.

Demographic time bomb

And with Japan already struggling to find ways to overcome a demographic challenge of too few babies being born and people living longer - thus requiring more pensions and expensive advanced medical care - the results of a new survey make bleak reading.

Share


Why fewer Japanese are seeking marriage

The number of young Japanese men and women wanting to get married has seen a sharp decline, reveals a new study. What are the reasons behind this trend and how is it impacting society? Julian Ryall reports from Tokyo.

Looking back, Makoto Watanabe wishes he had gotten married in his early 30s, but he admits back then he had neither the job security nor the financial resources to support a wife and family.

Now he is 41-years old and a lecturer in communications and media at Hokkaido Bunkyo University. But Watanabe says he fears he may have left it too late.

"The older I get, the busier I also seem to get and there are fewer and fewer opportunities to meet 'the one'," he told DW. "Now I have my career and I'm comfortably off, but I certainly have regrets that I did not marry when I had a chance when I was younger."

Watanabe's plight is identical to that of thousands of young Japanese men and women, who are unable to find a partner due to any one of a number of reasons, although the largest obstacles remain an inadequate salary to support a family and punishing work schedules limiting opportunities to interact with the opposite sex.

Demographic time bomb

And with Japan already struggling to find ways to overcome a demographic challenge of too few babies being born and people living longer - thus requiring more pensions and expensive advanced medical care - the results of a new survey make bleak reading.

Share


Why fewer Japanese are seeking marriage

The number of young Japanese men and women wanting to get married has seen a sharp decline, reveals a new study. What are the reasons behind this trend and how is it impacting society? Julian Ryall reports from Tokyo.

Looking back, Makoto Watanabe wishes he had gotten married in his early 30s, but he admits back then he had neither the job security nor the financial resources to support a wife and family.

Now he is 41-years old and a lecturer in communications and media at Hokkaido Bunkyo University. But Watanabe says he fears he may have left it too late.

"The older I get, the busier I also seem to get and there are fewer and fewer opportunities to meet 'the one'," he told DW. "Now I have my career and I'm comfortably off, but I certainly have regrets that I did not marry when I had a chance when I was younger."

Watanabe's plight is identical to that of thousands of young Japanese men and women, who are unable to find a partner due to any one of a number of reasons, although the largest obstacles remain an inadequate salary to support a family and punishing work schedules limiting opportunities to interact with the opposite sex.

Demographic time bomb

And with Japan already struggling to find ways to overcome a demographic challenge of too few babies being born and people living longer - thus requiring more pensions and expensive advanced medical care - the results of a new survey make bleak reading.

Share


Why fewer Japanese are seeking marriage

The number of young Japanese men and women wanting to get married has seen a sharp decline, reveals a new study. What are the reasons behind this trend and how is it impacting society? Julian Ryall reports from Tokyo.

Looking back, Makoto Watanabe wishes he had gotten married in his early 30s, but he admits back then he had neither the job security nor the financial resources to support a wife and family.

Now he is 41-years old and a lecturer in communications and media at Hokkaido Bunkyo University. But Watanabe says he fears he may have left it too late.

"The older I get, the busier I also seem to get and there are fewer and fewer opportunities to meet 'the one'," he told DW. "Now I have my career and I'm comfortably off, but I certainly have regrets that I did not marry when I had a chance when I was younger."

Watanabe's plight is identical to that of thousands of young Japanese men and women, who are unable to find a partner due to any one of a number of reasons, although the largest obstacles remain an inadequate salary to support a family and punishing work schedules limiting opportunities to interact with the opposite sex.

Demographic time bomb

And with Japan already struggling to find ways to overcome a demographic challenge of too few babies being born and people living longer - thus requiring more pensions and expensive advanced medical care - the results of a new survey make bleak reading.

Share


Why fewer Japanese are seeking marriage

The number of young Japanese men and women wanting to get married has seen a sharp decline, reveals a new study. What are the reasons behind this trend and how is it impacting society? Julian Ryall reports from Tokyo.

Looking back, Makoto Watanabe wishes he had gotten married in his early 30s, but he admits back then he had neither the job security nor the financial resources to support a wife and family.

Now he is 41-years old and a lecturer in communications and media at Hokkaido Bunkyo University. But Watanabe says he fears he may have left it too late.

"The older I get, the busier I also seem to get and there are fewer and fewer opportunities to meet 'the one'," he told DW. "Now I have my career and I'm comfortably off, but I certainly have regrets that I did not marry when I had a chance when I was younger."

Watanabe's plight is identical to that of thousands of young Japanese men and women, who are unable to find a partner due to any one of a number of reasons, although the largest obstacles remain an inadequate salary to support a family and punishing work schedules limiting opportunities to interact with the opposite sex.

Demographic time bomb

And with Japan already struggling to find ways to overcome a demographic challenge of too few babies being born and people living longer - thus requiring more pensions and expensive advanced medical care - the results of a new survey make bleak reading.

Share


Why fewer Japanese are seeking marriage

The number of young Japanese men and women wanting to get married has seen a sharp decline, reveals a new study. What are the reasons behind this trend and how is it impacting society? Julian Ryall reports from Tokyo.

Looking back, Makoto Watanabe wishes he had gotten married in his early 30s, but he admits back then he had neither the job security nor the financial resources to support a wife and family.

Now he is 41-years old and a lecturer in communications and media at Hokkaido Bunkyo University. But Watanabe says he fears he may have left it too late.

"The older I get, the busier I also seem to get and there are fewer and fewer opportunities to meet 'the one'," he told DW. "Now I have my career and I'm comfortably off, but I certainly have regrets that I did not marry when I had a chance when I was younger."

Watanabe's plight is identical to that of thousands of young Japanese men and women, who are unable to find a partner due to any one of a number of reasons, although the largest obstacles remain an inadequate salary to support a family and punishing work schedules limiting opportunities to interact with the opposite sex.

Demographic time bomb

And with Japan already struggling to find ways to overcome a demographic challenge of too few babies being born and people living longer - thus requiring more pensions and expensive advanced medical care - the results of a new survey make bleak reading.

Share


Why fewer Japanese are seeking marriage

The number of young Japanese men and women wanting to get married has seen a sharp decline, reveals a new study. What are the reasons behind this trend and how is it impacting society? Julian Ryall reports from Tokyo.

Looking back, Makoto Watanabe wishes he had gotten married in his early 30s, but he admits back then he had neither the job security nor the financial resources to support a wife and family.

Now he is 41-years old and a lecturer in communications and media at Hokkaido Bunkyo University. But Watanabe says he fears he may have left it too late.

"The older I get, the busier I also seem to get and there are fewer and fewer opportunities to meet 'the one'," he told DW. "Now I have my career and I'm comfortably off, but I certainly have regrets that I did not marry when I had a chance when I was younger."

Watanabe's plight is identical to that of thousands of young Japanese men and women, who are unable to find a partner due to any one of a number of reasons, although the largest obstacles remain an inadequate salary to support a family and punishing work schedules limiting opportunities to interact with the opposite sex.

Demographic time bomb

And with Japan already struggling to find ways to overcome a demographic challenge of too few babies being born and people living longer - thus requiring more pensions and expensive advanced medical care - the results of a new survey make bleak reading.

Share


Why fewer Japanese are seeking marriage

The number of young Japanese men and women wanting to get married has seen a sharp decline, reveals a new study. What are the reasons behind this trend and how is it impacting society? Julian Ryall reports from Tokyo.

Looking back, Makoto Watanabe wishes he had gotten married in his early 30s, but he admits back then he had neither the job security nor the financial resources to support a wife and family.

Now he is 41-years old and a lecturer in communications and media at Hokkaido Bunkyo University. But Watanabe says he fears he may have left it too late.

"The older I get, the busier I also seem to get and there are fewer and fewer opportunities to meet 'the one'," he told DW. "Now I have my career and I'm comfortably off, but I certainly have regrets that I did not marry when I had a chance when I was younger."

Watanabe's plight is identical to that of thousands of young Japanese men and women, who are unable to find a partner due to any one of a number of reasons, although the largest obstacles remain an inadequate salary to support a family and punishing work schedules limiting opportunities to interact with the opposite sex.

Demographic time bomb

And with Japan already struggling to find ways to overcome a demographic challenge of too few babies being born and people living longer - thus requiring more pensions and expensive advanced medical care - the results of a new survey make bleak reading.

Share